4-VisualizeBench

This category of tools aims to enable machine learning practitioners and users to understand how machine-learning models may be attacked..
This includes:


EvadeML-Zoo Our Benchmarking and Visualization AE Tool is released

We are releasing EvadeML-Zoo: A Benchmarking and Visualization Tool for Adversarial Examples (with 8 pretrained deep models+ 9 state-of-art attacks).

Tool Github URL

evadePDF

About

We have designed and implemented EvadeML-Zoo, a benchmarking and visualization tool for research on adversarial machine learning. The goal of EvadeML-Zoo is to ease the experimental setup and help researchers evaluate and verify their results.

EvadeML-Zoo has a modular architecture and is designed to make it easy to add new datasets, pre-trained target models, attack or defense algorithms. The code is open source under the MIT license.

We have integrated three popular datasets: MNIST, CIFAR-10 and ImageNet- ILSVRC with a simple and unified interface. We offer several representative pre-trained models with state-of-the-art accuracy for each dataset including two pre-trained models for ImageNet-ILSVRC: the heavy Inception-v3 and and the lightweight MobileNet. We use Keras to access the pre-trained models because it provides a simplified interface and it is compatible with TensorFlow, which is a flexible tool for implementing attack and defense techniques.

We have integrated several existing attack algorithms as baseline for the upcoming new methods, including FGSM, BIM, JSMA, Deepfool, Universal Adversarial Perturbations, and Carlini and Wagner’s algorithms.

We have integrated our “feature squeezing” based detection framework in this toolbox. Formulating detecting adversarial examples as a binary classification task, we first construct a balanced dataset with equal number of legitimate and adversarial examples, and then split it into training and test subsets. A detection method has full access to the training set but no access to the labels of the test set. We measure the TPR and FPR on the test set as the benchmark detection results. Our Feature Squeezing functions as the detection baseline. Users can easily add more detection methods using our framework.

Besides, the tool comes with an interactive web-based visualization module adapted from our previous ADVERSARIAL-PLAYGROUND package. This module enables better understanding of the impact of attack algorithms on the resulting adversarial sample; users may specify attack algorithm parameters for a variety of attack types and generate new samples on-demand. The interface displays the resulting adversarial example as compared to the original, classification likelihoods, and the influence of a target model throughout layers of the network.

Citations

@article{xu2017feature,
  title={Feature Squeezing: Detecting Adversarial Examples in Deep Neural Networks},
  author={Xu, Weilin and Evans, David and Qi, Yanjun},
  journal={arXiv preprint arXiv:1704.01155},
  year={2017}
}

Support or Contact

Having troubl with our tools? Please contact Weilin and we’ll help you sort it out.


Adversarial-Playground Paper To Appear @ VizSec

Revised Version2 Paper Arxiv

Revised Title: Adversarial-Playground: A Visualization Suite Showing How Adversarial Examples Fool Deep Learning

Publish @ The IEEE Symposium on Visualization for Cyber Security (VizSec) 2017 -ULR

Presentation

GitHub: AdversarialDNN-Playground

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that attackers can force deep learning models to misclassify so-called “adversarial examples”: maliciously generated images formed by making imperceptible modifications to pixel values. With growing interest in deep learning for security applications, it is important for security experts and users of machine learning to recognize how learning systems may be attacked. Due to the complex nature of deep learning, it is challenging to understand how deep models can be fooled by adversarial examples. Thus, we present a web-based visualization tool, Adversarial-Playground, to demonstrate the efficacy of common adversarial methods against a convolutional neural network (CNN) system. Adversarial-Playground is educational, modular and interactive. (1) It enables non-experts to compare examples visually and to understand why an adversarial example can fool a CNN-based image classifier. (2) It can help security experts explore more vulnerability of deep learning as a software module. (3) Building an interactive visualization is challenging in this domain due to the large feature space of image classification (generating adversarial examples is slow in general and visualizing images are costly). Through multiple novel design choices, our tool can provide fast and accurate responses to user requests. Empirically, we find that our client-server division strategy reduced the response time by an average of 1.5 seconds per sample. Our other innovation, a faster variant of JSMA evasion algorithm, empirically performed twice as fast as JSMA and yet maintains a comparable evasion rate. Project source code and data from our experiments available at: GitHub

Citations

@article{norton2017advplayground,
  title={Adversarial-Playground: A Visualization Suite Showing How Adversarial Examples Fool Deep Learning},
  author={Norton, Andrew and Qi, Yanjun},
  url = {http://arxiv.org/abs/1708.00807}
  year={2017},
}

Support or Contact

Having trouble with our tools? Please contact Andrew Norton and we’ll help you sort it out.


Adversarial-Playground- A Visualization Suite for Adversarial Sample Generation

Paper Arxiv

GitHub: AdversarialDNN-Playground

Poster

Abstract

With growing interest in adversarial machine learning, it is important for machine learning practitioners and users to understand how their models may be attacked. We propose a web-based visualization tool, \textit{Adversarial-Playground}, to demonstrate the efficacy of common adversarial methods against a deep neural network (DNN) model, built on top of the TensorFlow library. Adversarial-Playground provides users an efficient and effective experience in exploring techniques generating adversarial examples, which are inputs crafted by an adversary to fool a machine learning system. To enable Adversarial-Playground to generate quick and accurate responses for users, we use two primary tactics: (1) We propose a faster variant of the state-of-the-art Jacobian saliency map approach that maintains a comparable evasion rate. (2) Our visualization does not transmit the generated adversarial images to the client, but rather only the matrix describing the sample and the vector representing classification likelihoods.

Playground

pg pg

Citations

@article{norton2017advplayground,
  title={Adversarial Playground: A Visualization Suite for Adversarial Sample Generation},
  author={Norton, Andrew and Qi, Yanjun},
  url = {http://arxiv.org/abs/1706.01763}
  year={2017},
}

Support or Contact

Having trouble with our tools? Please contact Andrew Norton and we’ll help you sort it out.